Saturday, December 3, 2016

Rushdie in Broken Binary

She crash-landed 
from the birth canal
right to the city walk,
chain smoking 
and quoting Rushdie 
in broken binary.

No one taught her 
how to paint her toe nails.
She just always sort of knew
how to lacquer and file
her sharp edges 
down to someone
worth splitting
pancakes with
on a Thursday afternoon. 


Written for Kerry's 55 Flash prompt at Real Toads.  The challenge - write a poem in 55 words inspired by a clip from the movie Samsara.  Here is my offering to the well. with all poems on this blog, this is a work in progress.  Please let me know your thoughts, criticisms, feedback, etc.   Viva la. 


21 comments:

  1. I especially like the cleverness of the first stanza. If this is a work in progress, leave that one alone. It's stunning as is.

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  2. Thanks for the input, Rommy. I will take that under advisement when writing the next draft.

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  3. I love how you let your poetic words settle in the ordinary of a Thursday afternoon - there is poetry in sharing pancakes.

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    1. Thanks Bjorn....it felt like the piece wanted to go there, so I let it.

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  4. This is pure wonder. One of those poems that's impossible not to love, at least for me.

    I'm saying this because I have a severe aversion to anything that has to do with cigarettes. But the poem is so powerful--the rawness of birth and being able to take care of oneself and even have time for a pretty thing and relationships--that I don't mind the smoke. In fact, I can't imagine the poem without the chain smoking. Wonderful!

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    1. I'm pleased you enjoyed this one, bad habits and all.

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  5. This is very powerful. For some, it is an art to become "someone worth splitting pancakes with." The lack of a mother is painfully clear, as is the hunger to be loved and accepted ... perhaps by the male coworker I perceive her to be having an affair with (based on the line break after "file" and the fact that most people are working on Thursday afternoon; I'm thinking they're at a hotel during a business conference or that they're meeting midday while they're assumed to be at work).

    I'm probably wrong, of course.

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    1. I like that you found a story of your own. There is no right or wrong, and I often write my poetry a bit more vague so that you can do just that....make it your own. Thanks for reading.

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  6. I am now so interested in this character, I want to know more of her.

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  7. This is quite an intriguing poem, makes me want to know more!❤️

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  8. yes, i too am curious to this on-going saga

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  9. Izy, so excited you were inspired to write to this prompt..and this poem is a case in point of why you have been one of my greatest inspirations in 7 years of blogging.

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  10. Love the way this poem ambles and slides, drawing in the package of Rushdie and all the ultimate seriousness of disintegration and dispute that his work(in binary, indeed) implies in our tizzy of a world, as well as the common, simple acts of life and personality that soften the madhouse walls with their intimate padding. Good to read you, Izy.

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  11. oh, yes!! pure genius and a very deep understanding here of broken people. LOVE the ending with pancakes...not flat, but sweet!

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  12. This is just too damn cool. I love it!

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  13. I love this, Isadora! Just the idea of quoting Rushdie in broken binary is cool! I especially enjoyed the whole of the first stanza and the ending of the second stanza.

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  14. a bit disturbing...intriguing...powerfully put!!

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  15. for some reason your 55's sharp edges yet remind me of crepe, the kind you'd find at a halloween party, how it crinkles and clings and frames a sort of hazy memory. but then I'm 2 glasses of wine in, and it's dark outside. anyways, loved it ~

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  16. She just always sort of knew
    how to lacquer and file
    her sharp edges
    down to someone
    worth splitting
    pancakes with
    on a Thursday afternoon.

    so much to find in these lines alone (much like the rest of the write) - due to societal dumping we're all so attuned to our weaknesses and sharp edges that filing them down comes as second nature. No one wants to split pancakes with the truth now do they, it'd be awfully awkward

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